Recent Newsletters

Mental Health Minute: Mindfulness

During the current self-quarantine period it can be difficult not to wonder and maybe even worry about what the future will hold. You may have many questions which can cause you to be distressed. While it is important to stay informed and up to date on what’s going on, if we become too focused about worrying about the future we are missing out on the joy or opportunities the current moments might have to offer. Focusing too much on future events, some of which are out of our control, can also create uncomfortable feelings. If you find this happening to you, I would encourage you to create some sort of mindfulness practice.

Mindfulness takes place when we focus our thoughts on the present moment without judging those thoughts. By focusing on the present moment, we are reducing the distressing feelings worrying about the future can create. Bringing your thoughts back to what you are doing in the present moment also can give you more joy in the moment and more connection to the people you are with. One way to learn mindfulness is through meditation. There are several apps available for your phone with guided meditations that can help you practice mindfulness. Praying or repeating a positive phrase such as “I can do this,” or “This too shall pass,” can be soothing and can bring your focus back to the present moment. You can also learn to eat mindfully. Taking time to slow down and notice the smell, taste and texture of each bite of food will help you bring your thoughts back to what you are doing and may also help you enjoy your meal more. Journaling, coloring and creating mandalas are also ways to help your thoughts slow down and focus on what you are doing in the moment which will help you become more mindful.

As we work to adjust to the changes that are taking place in our world, I would encourage you to set aside several minutes a day to start creating a mindfulness practice. You might be surprised to find out how helpful this skill will be for you in other times in your life as well.

Please continue to stay safe. You are important. We are here for you and we will get through this together.

Ms. Cecelia

Cecelia A. Bushery, MA, LMHC

If you are in crisis, please remember that the following services are available to speak or text with you 24/7:

  • NAMI 24/7 Crisis Text Line: Text “NAMI” TO 741741

  • NAMI Pinellas:

  1. Family Help Line: 727-791-3434

  2. Peer Support Help Line: 727-600-5838

  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433)

  • Pinellas County Mobile Crisis Response Team: 727-362-4424

  • Suicide/Emergency Hotline – Pinellas County: 727-791-3131

  • Crisis Center of Tampa Bay (for financial, mental health or domestic violence issues): Dial 211

  • National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

  • CASA:

  1. 24 HOUR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE: (727) 895-4912 | TTY: (727) 828-1269

  2. OUTSIDE PINELLAS COUNTY: (800) 500-1119 | TTY: (800) 621-4202

  • The Haven: Domestic Violence Hotline: (727) 442-4128, TDD: (727) 223-4946

  • Rape Crisis Line – Local: 727-530-7273


ART THERAPY: MANDALAS


Supplies:

One 8 ½ x 11 inch sheet of white paper with a circle traced on it

Pencil

Various colored pencils

Instructions:

Fold your paper in half width-wise.

Fold your paper again from side to side. Your paper should now look like a book.

Open your paper. Your paper will now have four sections in it. Draw a small circle, square, or triangle shape in the center of your paper.

Start to fill in the paper from the center working your way outwards with circles, squares, triangles or any other shapes you would like.

Each time you add a shape to one part of the mandala you must also add the same shape to all the corresponding parts of the mandala in each of the four parts of your paper.

Once you have filled the mandala circle with shapes you can now work on coloring your mandala.